Category Archives: Support

Educators’ Guide to Gifted Children

GHF is a wonderful all-volunteer organization working hard to serve some of the same population the Asynchronous Scholars’ Fund seeks to serve, by offering community and information resources both to gifted homeschoolers and to the broader population of families with gifted kids in general.

Screen Shot 2018-01-29 at 3.33.26 PMAs an individual, I volunteer for GHF as part of their professional outreach team. They recently asked me to write another brochure for them following on the success of the Healthcare Professionals’ Guide to Gifted Children last year, and I was honored to help.

The Educators’ Guide to Gifted Children is now available on the GHF website free of charge. So many myths about gifted children and education exist. Unfortunately, even many educators buy into these myths (see link to Giftedness 101). Educators, like parents, want what’s best for kids.

This brochure aims to help provide accurate information about what gifted kids need in educational settings, whether in schools, at home, or out in communities. Please share it with the educators you know, and let GHF know how it helps. Better yet, support GHF in their work, and you’ll be helping thousands of kids and families worldwide.

– Marlow

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National Parenting Gifted Children Week

It’s National Parenting Gifted Children Week this week, and SENG is hosting a blog tour. Parenting is hard enough as it is, and when you add the special needs of gifted/asynchronous kids, it’s even harder. We’ve heard such excellent things from our network about how wonderful SENG’s annual conference is for parents and asynchronous kids. The annual conference is over (but there’s always next year!), but we hope the resources on SENG’s site, and in the blogs posting for the blog tour, will be of some help.

Alisa: A true (anonymous) story

We are proud to share with you the exclusive trailer of the claymation PSA we’re working on: This is Alicia (Trailer).

The full film is coming in January 2012, but here’s a synopsis:

Did you know that there is an entire class of children in this country who are so grossly misunderstood that no one helps them, not even when their need is extreme?

This is Alisa. She is many ages at once — 6 years old chronologically, but 20 when she reads astronomy, 8 years old socially, and 4 when she tries to write neatly. She is asynchronous. Some people call this being a high-potential child. But her potential will never be realized if her extremely intense needs aren’t met. Worse yet, the fact that society is failing to meet Alisa’s needs is damaging, frightening, and alienating to her. She should have the same right to have her needs met as any other child.

There are thousands of kids like Alisa in the United States, kids who are many ages at once. They are as diverse as the population of our country.

You can make a difference. Donate to the Asynchronous Scholars’ Fund today. Thank you for your support!